Drought

Date: 

4 Sep 2018

Author: 

Craig Sutherland

Publisher: 

Kerr Wood Leidal

Date: 

29 Jul 2018

Author: 

Jarod Szczot

Publisher: 

FLNRORD

Dry Koksilah River threatens fish in Cowichan Valley

Sarah Simpson, Cowichan Valley Citizen, 05 Sep 2017

The Koksilah River is in trouble, with low flows threatening fish populations.

The provincial government has announced a level 3 drought rating and is calling for voluntary 30 per cent water-use reductions for residents of Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands as temperatures continue to soar.

Of particular concern is the hot weather negatively affecting stream and river flows and water supplies.

Islanders urged to conserve water

Information Bulletin, Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development, 01 Sep 2017

With weather conditions expected to remain warm and dry in the coming week, dropping water levels have prompted the Province to announce a Level 3 drought rating for Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands.

Level 3 drought conditions call for voluntary water-use reductions of 30% from all surface water and groundwater users, including residents, industry, farmers and municipalities.

Pumps to feed dangerously low Cowichan River installed

James Goldie, Cowichan Valley Citizen, Sep 30, 2016

Workers use a large crane to move equipment as pumps are installed.Which leaves one big question: will it be necessary to turn them on?

Last week, crews were hard at work installing the equipment that will ensure water flow over the weir in the event that lake levels drop below 161 metres, which is when the weir reaches “zero storage.” The pumps are located on the north side of the weir near the boat lock.

Media Event: Commissioning of 20 Pumps to Move Water from Cowichan Lake into Cowichan River

Media Release, Catalyst Paper, Cowichan Tribes, CVRD, September 28 2016

Global Climate Change Impacting Cowichan Valley: 20 High-volume Pumps to
Keep Cowichan River from Running Dry by Moving Water from Cowichan Lake

Media invited to view commissioning of operation that will pump six Olympic-sized swimming pools of water per hour, speak with local leaders on long-term solutions needed before it’s too late

Climate change threatens survival of Cowichan River

David Anderson, Vancouver Sun, September 23, 2106

During my time as federal Environment and Fisheries Minister I experienced firsthand how climate change was affecting Canada’s environment.  It is by far the most critical challenge that governments of the world are facing. It is not a problem for those living far away or a problem for far in the future. Climate change impacts are showing up right here and they are showing up now.

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